» Archive for the 'Cake' Category

Passionfruit cake

Thursday, August 9th, 2012 by Tina

I have become obsessed with this cake, after testing it for the CWA challenge at work. It is a delicious and moist cake with the refreshing flavour of passionfruit to lighten it up. I have made a few changes to make it my own as the original had a tendency to crack. I bake mine at a lower temperature for longer which helps it not to crack as much, it still cracks a little, but settles back to almost flat with just a gentle dome. I’ve also cut the raising agent by replacing some of the self raising flour with plain flour.

Passionfruit Cake

(adapted from a CWA recipe)

Cake

250g butter, softened
220g (1 cup) caster sugar
3 eggs (room temperature), separated
200g self raising flour
100g plain flour
180ml (3/4 cup) buttermilk
1/4 cup passionfruit pulp

Passionfruit icing

1 cup icing sugar, sifted
1 teaspoon full cream milk
1 to 1 ½ tablespoons sieved passion fruit pulp

  1. Pre heat oven to 160C conventional. Grease a 20cm aluminium round cake pan with softened butter, line the base with a round of greased baking paper. Dust base and sides lightly with flour and firmly tap out any excess flour.
  2. Beat butter and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer with a scraper paddle until light and fluffy, this can take 5-8 minutes. Beat in egg yolks, one at a time until combined.
  3. Add passionfruit pulp to buttermilk, combine sifted flours in a bowl. On low speed, add buttermilk and flour alternately to mixer bowl until just combined.
  4. Beat egg whites with a whisk until soft peaks form. Fold into cake mixture with a large kitchen spoon or spatula in two batches.
  5. Spread mixture into prepared pan, level the top and tap firmly on the bench. Bake in oven for 1 hour to 1 hour 20 or until cooked in the centre and golden on top. Stand for 5-10 minutes before turning onto a clean tea towel on a baking tray. Remove baking paper from base of cake if it has come out of the tin. Leave upside down to cool for 10 minutes if you want a flattish top. To invert, place a serving plate or baking tray on the cake and use the baking tray to support the cake. Hold together and carefully flip so the serving plate is on the bottom.
  6. For passionfruit icing, stir icing sugar, milk and enough passion fruit pulp to form a thick icing. Keep bowl of icing covered with cling wrap until ready to use so it doesn’t form a skin.
  7. Once cake has cooled, ice top with passionfruit icing. You can ice while warm but the icing will run down the sides of the cake.

N.B.

If you don’t have buttermilk you can replace it with 140ml full cream milk mixed with 2 tablespoons natural yoghurt

This cake is really good straight out of the oven, and it looks quite pretty when the icing runs down the sides :)

 

Lemon & almond syrup cake or Rose’s ‘Golden Dream Cake’

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012 by Tina

Roses

Candied lemon peel roses

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Lemon and almond syrup cake with white chocolate buttercream

There was such a delicious feast at Iain and Jules’ engagement party that we didn’t get through all of the cake, what a shame, we had to divvy the rest up to scoff at home.

Jules, I need recipes for the adobo pork and chicken, and the vermicelli noodles, yum!

This recipe is from Rose Levy Beranbaum’s amazing book, ‘Rose’s Heavenly Cakes’. I picked up so many great tips from her perfectly tested and detailed recipes. Everyone loved the lemon peel roses. One small person was heard asking ‘can you eat them?’. Cute. Of course you could, but mine were a little on the firm side. Next time I would try to take a little less white pith with them as I peeled them as I think they were a little stiff.

Pumpkin Pie

Monday, June 6th, 2011 by Tina

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It seemed like the weather for pie. I remembered my mum’s pumpkin pie from when I was little and thought how nice it would be to make a non-vegan version. Mum’s recipe was vegan and was delicious; so how much more delicious with eggs and cream!!

The recipe I used was from joy of baking.com and I took the advice of making it more delicious by pressing crushed gingernut biscuits into the unbaked pastry for extra flavour. I think this pie is best cold, though I couldn’t resist eating some warm. It just tastes more eggy while warm. The crust is crisp and the filling is moist and beautifully spiced.

As pumpkin pie is not nearly as popular in Australia as the USA it’s rare to come across one in a Sydney cafe or cake shop. So make your own and enjoy!

Cake

Thursday, November 26th, 2009 by Tina

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A hazelnut raspberry cake with white chocolate ganache and white chocolate panels.

Chocolate Cake

Thursday, January 29th, 2009 by Tina

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I believe there may end up being many posts with a similar title, but for my friends who requested the recipe for the Chocolate Buttermilk Cake enjoyed on a Friday night a few weeks ago, here it is. Thought we should also take a pic before it is all demolished.

This is a really easy recipe, similar in method to making brownies and the buttermilk adds such a lovely flavour to the cake that makes it moist and moreish and not at all sickly.

Just type in Chocolate Buttermilk Cake, at the Australian Women’s Weekly Website: http://aww.ninemsn.com.au/

Notes:

1. I used my grandma’s old springform tin which is 23cm (so a little bigger than the recommended 22cm)  and I checked the cake along the way but didn’t put a skewer in until 7 minutes before the end of the cooking time and it was definitely cooked by then. It was still moist, but I like my cakes on the cooked but gooey side. So next time I will pull it out after 1 hour, instead of the recommended 1 hour 15. My new oven is a strong beast and I am still getting used to it!

2. As you are using so much chocolate in the recipe it has a tendency to go black on top if you are not careful. Burnt chocolate is not nice. A few tips: one is when you line the base and sides of the tin with baking paper make the baking paper wider so it sits an inch or two above the pan so that it provides a little extra protection from over browning, or you can also keep an eye on it and towards the last 20-30 minutes put a piece of foil or baking paper on top to stop the browning process. This is easier if you are not using fan-forced as it will blow around a bit!

Icing

The Chocolate Ganache icing was made based on a recipe from Stephanie Alexander’s Cooks Companion and I used Lindt Intense Orange chocolate  (a pantry staple, well there is always some chocolate, it just happened to be this one yesterday) which gave the icing a Jaffa flavour, yum.

Buttermilk

Link below for those wanting a bit more info on buttermilk. It is also nice in muffins or pancakes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttermilk

Wedding Cake

Monday, July 14th, 2008 by Tina

Thomas Walter and Malini Christine Ganesan celebrated their wedding in February this year at the delicious Sardinian restaurant Pilu at Freshwater in Sydney. I was lucky enough to be asked if I could make the cake…

The layers are (from top to bottom)

Fruit Cake 6″

Chocolate Buttermilk Cake 9″

Hazelnut Raspberry Cake 12″

All layers are covered in Chocolate Ganache and have a dark chocolate collar, fresh strawberries, blueberries and cherries.

The guests ate the bottom two layers at the wedding, and they finished both layers! That was after dessert…

Hazelnut Raspberry Cake

Made again for Thomas’ 40th birthday party in June. We enjoyed it with an espresso or two, made on a machine borrowed from their good friend Peter.

*Recipe from the Australian Women’s Weekly Website.

Fruitcake

The top layer of fruit cake travelled back to Ulm in Germany and was not touched until my visit in June. What a surprise they had waited. It was perfect for eating by then.

*Recipe from Belinda Jeffery’s luscious book ‘Mix and Bake’.